This is Africa

Jim & Tyler – 2017 carpentry skills program graduate

Hello from South Africa. Our return trip was uneventful and we’ve been busy in the township the past 6 weeks. The initial period is particularly enjoyable as we reconnect with the many youth we have come to know.

As we drive along the main road in the township, the boys are quick to wave or call out our names. Driving requires frequent stops in order to say hello and catch up with many of the guys. Plenty of smiles and African handshakes!

Janet and Prayer (grade 12)

Since the South African school year is January to December, Janet was in high demand upon her return to help the high school boys prepare for final exams. This is also the time when applications to attend college, university, or vocational training must be finalized for 2018.

Siyambonga – age 16, grade 10 (with dog Sheba). Siyabonga regularly attends Janet’s tutoring groups

Many of the boys are doing well, including each of the young guys who attend college and university. Thomas and Paul both graduated from business degree programs in 2017, Aphiwe completed Mechanical Engineering technology in 2017, Ben and Wanga graduate with computer science degrees in 2018, Kudzai will graduate with a BA Hons in 2019, and Siyathemba and Onke are on track to complete business/economics degrees in 2020.

Class of 2017 – Hands & Heart Carpentry Skills

Youth enrolled in the one year, Hands & Heart carpentry/welding skills program graduated November 30th, and some have already secured employment or further training. Many of these young men did not complete grade 8 or 9, but now have the prospect of a job and income. Jim deals with dozens of boys who cease attending high school between grades 7 and 9 due to weak literacy/numeracy skills and dysfunctional home environments. Not surprisingly, many are struggling to find their path in life.

Angel & Jim

Angel discontinued school in 2016, prior to completing grade 9. Shortly thereafter, Jim introduced him to the Hands & Heart carpentry skills program which he completed in November 2017. Angel starts a 1 year paid internship at Hope HQ in January 2018. Successfully completing Hands and Heart was a huge accomplishment for Angel, and we are proud of him. While working at Hope HQ, he will learn the skills associated with the craft of producing a brand of hand-carved birds which enjoy a worldwide following.

Danwille – age 19

Jim met Danwille (pronounced dan-ville) in early 2016 while he was in grade 9 and struggling at school and home. Danwille commenced the Hands and Heart carpentry program in January 2017, graduated 2 weeks ago, and commenced full-time employment with a reputable construction firm last week. Jim met the company owner a few years ago and recently contacted him regarding an opportunity for this hard-working young man.

Government-sponsored school lunch program (primary school in Knysna township)

Mandla is 23 years old and grew up in an orphanage from age 6 to 18. He has been featured on our blog numerous times since we met when he was in grade 10. He graduated with a Social Work auxiliary certificate in 2017, sponsored by the Khayamandi Foundation (USA), and commences full-time employment in January His employer, an NGO focused on youth development, had this to say:

“He definitely deserves it. He has proven himself being a dedicated and responsible young man that refused to let his circumstances stand in his way. We are blessed to have him on the team. He will be appointed as Family Reconstruction Worker… His main duties will be to liaise with the child, parents, schools and the welfare sector.”

Playing dominoes in Hornlee (Knysna) – Jade, Naldo, Wachied, Urhll, and the guys.

“A mentor is someone who allows you to see the hope inside yourself.” Oprah Winfrey

Simbulele

We met Simbulele when he was 15 and in grade 9. He is now 21 years of age, graduated high school in 2016, and completed 8 months of skills training in 2017.

We’ve faced many challenges together, however Simbulele is doing well and has come a long way. He is currently working in a local restaurant and starts a permanent job in January as an Early Childhood Development Registration Assistant with the Knysna Education Trust (KET). KET is a local NGO which enjoys an excellent reputation, and this is a terrific opportunity for Simbulele. Thank you to Bev & Tony of Ottawa, Canada for believing in this fine young man.   (Knysna Education Trust website)

December 8 2017 – windy, dusty day in the township

Many of the profiled youth come from extremely dysfunctional home environments. Some of the boys live with an alcoholic parent(s) who is verbally and/or physically abusive. For others, both parents are deceased.

Money spent on alcohol or drugs means food is often lacking. When faced with the choice between buying bread or soap, bread commonly wins out. It is not uncommon for boys to lack soap or toothpaste. Imagine yourself at the age of 14, for example, struggling to survive in circumstances beyond your control.

Inadequate nutrition, poor hygiene, and cramped living conditions result in high rates of tuberculosis. Three of the boys mentioned in this post were diagnosed with TB since we returned to SA, one of whom after Jim recognized his symptoms and recommended he be tested.

December 2017 – Knysna township

This is Africa. When tourists visit scenic Cape Town or Knysna and claim that South Africa is not real Africa, we beg to differ. Visit the Cape Flats (townships) surrounding Cape Town and see how the majority of the population lives.

Please don’t be fooled by the orderly rows of government-provided concrete block houses in most townships. It’s the living conditions within these homes, and the many shacks, which reflects reality.  

Almost one third of South Africa’s children are under the age of 15. 

Leighton – age 14

“78% of our Grade 4 students can’t read. Not in English, not in their home language, not in any language. Of the 50 countries that participated in the test, we came dead last.” (The South African Child Gauge 2017)

Each day we are reminded of the impact one person can have in the life of a teenage boy or young man. Too many youth lack someone in their life to provide guidance, encouragement, and hope. 

If not for your individual donations, educational funding from the Khayamandi Foundation (Augusta, Georgia – U.S.A), and financial support from The Moondance Foundation (Wales – U.K.), much of what we accomplish would not be possible.  

Thank you very much for your ongoing support.

We wish you and your family a Merry Christmas!   Janet & Jim 

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